Monthly Archives: June 2017

My spot, your spot.

I grew up on an island with seven million other people. Let’s just say it was difficult to find a spot to call your own. One day, as a youngin’ exploring the world on my bike, I broke off a path that ran along Sunrise highway and continued on down a hiking trail that snaked along a waterway in the local state park. I eventually came to a small clearing, sat down, and heard the weirdest thing. Nobody. No cars, no lawnmowers, no people. Just the birds and the chipmunks and the occasional splash of a fish.

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I felt as if I had stumbled on secret treasure. I spent a lot of time at this spot over my formative years, reading and thinking and being alone with my little patch of Long Island wilderness.

Before I left town for college I carved a “V” into the tree next to the water and said goodbye. While at college, I decided to major in biology, a decision shaped by my time out in the woods watching nature. I even wrote an essay about this spot for my freshmen writing class.

That biology major took on a life of its own, turning into an adventure through states, labs, and disciplines, and eventually resulting in a PhD from a zoology department and a dissertation on cancer and aging.
Last weekend Begum and I were visiting my parents and we decided to go for a quick hike before the ferry back to CT. A rush of memories came back, and I ran along this trail explaining my spot to her. She eventually found the V for me.

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Both of these images are from June 2017

It was the first time in over a decade that I set foot in this clearing. Needless to say, it was a powerful experience, and it sparked a bout of retrospection that, thankfully, I have been happy to ride.
I said a thank you, and another goodbye, and we ran to catch our ferry.

This summer, I hope you go out and explore, and find your own spot.

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Spider Sunday is back! Kind of.

Spider Sund… err… Monday is back!

Back when we lived in Florida, stumbling on cool spiders was easy. Just open your door, take a few steps, and BOOM, golden orb-weaver (not to be confused with a yellow garden spider) taking care of your wasp problem. Or role out of bed to discover your new roommate, a Carolina Wolf, is on the prowl for mice (I presume). Maybe she’ll even bring along her closest 100 kin.

But New England, with its “seasons,” is a different story*. So, imagine my surprise and delight when Begum and I were hiking around Farm River State Park and saw this little fella scurry across the path:

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At Farm River State Park, CT. Picture taken with Galaxy s7. 

After some quick searches, I outsourced my initial guess to the amazing sciencesphere of twitter:

@HereBeSpiders11 with the save! Looks like this is a type of ground spider (we did find it on the ground), specifically it looks like a male Sergiolus capulatusThanks!

Some suspect that the awesome pattern may be an adaptation to mimic the velvet ant (which is actually a wingless wasp), known for their extremely painful stings!

Looking forward to what we find on our next hike.

*Actually, maybe it is not such a different story. Looks like we will just have to be more attentive on our next hike!