Category Archives: Spider

Spider Sunday is back! Kind of.

Spider Sund… err… Monday is back!

Back when we lived in Florida, stumbling on cool spiders was easy. Just open your door, take a few steps, and BOOM, golden orb-weaver (not to be confused with a yellow garden spider) taking care of your wasp problem. Or role out of bed to discover your new roommate, a Carolina Wolf, is on the prowl for mice (I presume). Maybe she’ll even bring along her closest 100 kin.

But New England, with its “seasons,” is a different story*. So, imagine my surprise and delight when Begum and I were hiking around Farm River State Park and saw this little fella scurry across the path:

20170610_131039

At Farm River State Park, CT. Picture taken with Galaxy s7. 

After some quick searches, I outsourced my initial guess to the amazing sciencesphere of twitter:

@HereBeSpiders11 with the save! Looks like this is a type of ground spider (we did find it on the ground), specifically it looks like a male Sergiolus capulatusThanks!

Some suspect that the awesome pattern may be an adaptation to mimic the velvet ant (which is actually a wingless wasp), known for their extremely painful stings!

Looking forward to what we find on our next hike.

*Actually, maybe it is not such a different story. Looks like we will just have to be more attentive on our next hike!

Spider Sunday is back! This week: Wolves in Your Backyard.

I have a confession. When I was young I wasn’t very kind to spiders. My behavior can likely be attributed to fear; growing up we are surrounded by imagery of spiders being dangerous and alien. We fear what we don’t understand. The internet says Marie Curie once said “Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.” And it’s true, the more I learned about spiders the less I squashed them. Now that I’m older, and a biologist, and living in Florida (read: constantly surrounded by giant spiders), I see spiders as fascinating, useful, and largely innocuous. And I’m on a mission to spread this view in order to gain back all the biology-karma I lost squashing spiders in my childhood. So, here are some neat facts I just learned after to a recent encounter.

Storytime. The other night I was outside enjoying the (relatively) cooler Floridian night and getting some work done. Suddenly I glimpsed a familiar shape darting towards the leg of my chair. A few inches long, but too meaty and agile to be an orbweaver or banana spider, I knew it had to be a wolf spider. So, I jumped up and reached for my phone and rushed to snap a picture before she retreated. When the flash went off I was greeted with a surprise…

Proud Wolf Spider Momma

Proud Wolf Spider Momma

Reflections. Reflections from eyes. But wait, why are there reflections coming from the spider’s abdomen?

Woah. Cool! Ok, so now I know that wolf spider’s eyes are reflective, just like I’ve seen (and posted about) before in Golden Orb-weavers…

20151014_115941

Golden Orb-weaver, La Chua Trail, Gainesville FL.

This is very similar to the reflections we’ve all seen before when shining a light towards certain mammals at night, such as cats or raccoons.

Raccoon hanging out behind UF's Science Library, Gainesville FL.

Raccoon hiding out behind UF’s Science Library, Gainesville FL.

So, what’s going on here? By reflecting light back through the retina there is more light available to the photoreceptors- enhancing night-vision. In vertebrates this is accomplished by the tapetum lucidum, or “bright tapestery” in Latin, a thin tissue membrane in the back of the eye. It looks like the tapetum has evolved independently in invertebrates and vertebrates, and actually exists in several invertebrate taxa including scallops, crustaceans, scorpions, and dragonflies. The tapetum in invertebrates consists of parallel strips of reflective guanine crystals- the same type of crystals that give fish their shiny metallic skin and allow chameleons to shift their skin color.

Want to see it for yourself? Go outside at night and shine a bright light into the grass. Those hundreds of reflective dots shining back? Wolf spiders looking at you. But fear not, for now you understand more. Just wear shoes.

(and share your cool spider pictures with me!)

Will the real Banana Spider please stand up?

I’ve encountered two different species of giant (subjective classification based on my previous New-York-State-only spider exposure) orb weaver spiders while living in Gainesville (and one non-orb weaver!). Both of which have been referred to as a ‘banana spider’. So, who are these spiders anyway, and which one is really the true banana spider?

20140830_103454

Exhibit A- picture taken at the La Chua trail.

20130827_200120

Exhibit B- picture taken in my front yard. (notice the flash reflection in the front eyes!)

It turns out that there are a few spiders referred to as a banana spider. However, only one of those spiders is pictured above, and it’s Exhibit B- the Golden Orb-Weaver (Nephila clavipes). Exhibit A, with its characteristic zigzag web, is commonly referred to as the Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia).

Apparently the Golden Orb-Weaver was recently moved out of the Orb-Weaver family and placed in the Nephilidae family because their webs weren’t sophisticated enough. Bummer!

Regardless of species name and web sophistication, if there’s one thing I’ve learned while living in Florida, it’s watch where you walk…

20130915_112150

Banana spider waiting to catch a low flying plane

 

Spider Sunday!

I was studying outside and got distracted by a few visitors today. First up is Leucuage venusta: the Orchard Orbweaver.

20140427_134331

I took this picture of a different orchard orbweaver earlier in the year:

orbweaver

Wikipedia seems to be a bit confused about how many species belong to the Araneidae orbweaver family (but what’s in a species, anyway?). Regardless of who belongs to the family, these spiders get their namesake from producing large spiraling webs to entrap their prey. Unlike my next visiter, Anasaitis canosa: the twin-flagged jumping spider.

20140427_140931

Jumping spiders, members of the family Salticidae, don’t sit and wait for their prey but actively hunt. They use their silk as a tether before pouncing on their meal- allowing them to return to the previous position if they miss.

Spiders are so cool.

 

Spiny Orb Weaver

image

We saw some interesting wildlife while hiking through O’leno State Park yesterday.

Golden Orb Weaver vs. Wasp

image

Thanks, spider buddy