Tag Archives: Florida

Spider Sunday is back! This week: Wolves in Your Backyard.

I have a confession. When I was young I wasn’t very kind to spiders. My behavior can likely be attributed to fear; growing up we are surrounded by imagery of spiders being dangerous and alien. We fear what we don’t understand. The internet says Marie Curie once said “Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.” And it’s true, the more I learned about spiders the less I squashed them. Now that I’m older, and a biologist, and living in Florida (read: constantly surrounded by giant spiders), I see spiders as fascinating, useful, and largely innocuous. And I’m on a mission to spread this view in order to gain back all the biology-karma I lost squashing spiders in my childhood. So, here are some neat facts I just learned after to a recent encounter.

Storytime. The other night I was outside enjoying the (relatively) cooler Floridian night and getting some work done. Suddenly I glimpsed a familiar shape darting towards the leg of my chair. A few inches long, but too meaty and agile to be an orbweaver or banana spider, I knew it had to be a wolf spider. So, I jumped up and reached for my phone and rushed to snap a picture before she retreated. When the flash went off I was greeted with a surprise…

Proud Wolf Spider Momma

Proud Wolf Spider Momma

Reflections. Reflections from eyes. But wait, why are there reflections coming from the spider’s abdomen?

Woah. Cool! Ok, so now I know that wolf spider’s eyes are reflective, just like I’ve seen (and posted about) before in Golden Orb-weavers…

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Golden Orb-weaver, La Chua Trail, Gainesville FL.

This is very similar to the reflections we’ve all seen before when shining a light towards certain mammals at night, such as cats or raccoons.

Raccoon hanging out behind UF's Science Library, Gainesville FL.

Raccoon hiding out behind UF’s Science Library, Gainesville FL.

So, what’s going on here? By reflecting light back through the retina there is more light available to the photoreceptors- enhancing night-vision. In vertebrates this is accomplished by the tapetum lucidum, or “bright tapestery” in Latin, a thin tissue membrane in the back of the eye. It looks like the tapetum has evolved independently in invertebrates and vertebrates, and actually exists in several invertebrate taxa including scallops, crustaceans, scorpions, and dragonflies. The tapetum in invertebrates consists of parallel strips of reflective guanine crystals- the same type of crystals that give fish their shiny metallic skin and allow chameleons to shift their skin color.

Want to see it for yourself? Go outside at night and shine a bright light into the grass. Those hundreds of reflective dots shining back? Wolf spiders looking at you. But fear not, for now you understand more. Just wear shoes.

(and share your cool spider pictures with me!)

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Will the real Banana Spider please stand up?

I’ve encountered two different species of giant (subjective classification based on my previous New-York-State-only spider exposure) orb weaver spiders while living in Gainesville (and one non-orb weaver!). Both of which have been referred to as a ‘banana spider’. So, who are these spiders anyway, and which one is really the true banana spider?

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Exhibit A- picture taken at the La Chua trail.

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Exhibit B- picture taken in my front yard. (notice the flash reflection in the front eyes!)

It turns out that there are a few spiders referred to as a banana spider. However, only one of those spiders is pictured above, and it’s Exhibit B- the Golden Orb-Weaver (Nephila clavipes). Exhibit A, with its characteristic zigzag web, is commonly referred to as the Yellow Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia).

Apparently the Golden Orb-Weaver was recently moved out of the Orb-Weaver family and placed in the Nephilidae family because their webs weren’t sophisticated enough. Bummer!

Regardless of species name and web sophistication, if there’s one thing I’ve learned while living in Florida, it’s watch where you walk…

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Banana spider waiting to catch a low flying plane

 

Awesome camouflage

Staying in the lab is tough when you live in the sunshine state. I mean, at SUNY Geneseo it was easier- the lab served as a warm refuge against those Western NY winds and clouds. So every once and again I’ll find a break in the Floridian sunshowers and bring my work outside. However, as any biologist can tell you, work is impossible outside because you always get distracted by some cool critter crawling by your laptop. Case in point: last time I tried this I noticed a little pile of moss moving across the table…

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… so of course I flipped it over…

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…and found legs! (Woah, I need to find out what this is.) Further investigation revealed impressive mandibles and a set of sticky spines:

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It looked very similar to an antlion, which is the larval form of a certain family of lacewing. Antlions are awesome in their own right, they form little trenches in the sand and eat ants that fall into their trap. I teach an intro bio lab on the spatial distribution of organisms, and I always take the students outside to hunt for antlions (they are typically (spoiler) clumped together in sandy spots under the eaves of buildings). And I always show this video:

Anyway, it turns out that critter I found was also a larval lacewing! Certain species have sticky spines on their back that trap debris and help the larva blend in with their environment. This isn’t a new tactic- scientists have found a 110 million year old larval lacewing trapped in amber that has fern trichomes stuck on its back. How cool is that?! (Another spoiler: very)

And such is the curse of the biologist- go outside to write and in minutes you are a few Wikipedia pages deep classifying insects.

Cuban Treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis)

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I am pretty sure this is a Cuban Treefrog, although please tell me if I’m wrong!

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I let it go outside (sorry native frogs :-/). Anyway, it was definitely a neat surprise to find inside! That is, if you aren’t native to Florida yourself.